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New York City’s Holiday Windows: A tFS Pictorial

Holiday window displays in NYC

New York is known across the globe for its incredible holiday window displays, many of which have people lining up around city blocks waiting to get a closer look. Here is a glimpse at some of this year’s most notable and spectacular department store displays.

Barneys New York

The Wall Street Journal recently published an article on the fashion industry’s recent obsession with foodie culture (think Momofuku’s David Chang appearing in the pages of American Vogue). The timing of the story couldn’t have been more fitting as perhaps the most eye-catching of all the window displays of Manhattan’s major department stores are the foodie-inspired windows at Barneys New York. Though not much is on display in the way of fashion, the store’s ode to the culinary industry’s greats is witty, colorful, and most importantly, fun. Who wouldn’t want to see Mario Batali’s mouth stuffed with a tomato, a cross-eyed Rachael Ray clock, or a "chef stew"? 

Barney's Holiday window display - foodie

Barney's Holiday window display - foodie 2

Barney's Holiday window display - foodie 3

 Next: Bergdorf Goodman


Bergdorf Goodman

Over at Bergdorf Goodman, the piece de resistence is a hand-made 17-and a-half-pound book on the past two decades of Bergdorf windows. Called “Windows at Bergdorf Goodman”, the tome measures 17×14 inches and retails for $550 (only 1,000 of the niche market books were created). As for the actual windows, they tie into the theme "Wish You Were Here” and take inspiration from fantasy travel to far-flung places. It’s hard to know where to look in the masterfully created displays, and while they don’t have the humor of Barneys, the way garments have been seamlessly woven into the elaborate visuals is stunning. 

Bergdorf Goodman holiday display 1

Bergdorf Goodman holiday display 1

Next: Cartier, Tiffany & Co. and Fendi


Cartier, Tiffany & Co. and Fendi

When it comes to the glitz of holiday lights, Tiffany & Co., Fendi, and Cartier take the cake. Cartier always sticks to its gorgeous signature red bow that envelops its stunning façade, and this season the windows feature moving jewelry boxes that ascend from below and pop open (perhaps to simulate what it would feel like to receive one of their pricey baubles!)

Cartier holiday display

Tiffany & Co., surrounded by a carpet dyed in the jeweler’s signature blue, is decked out with so many yellow and white lights, you can’t look at the multi-level store’s façade for too long without your eyes twitching!

Tiffany Holiday Display

Tiffany holiday display

Fendi’s lights mimic dripping icicles and feature the brand’s belt wrapping its top floor. 

 Fendi holiday window display

Next: Macy’s, Henri Bendel, Saks Fifth Avenue and Bloomingddale’s


Macy’s, Henri Bendel, Saks Fifth Avenue and Bloomingdale’s

Macys windows

Macy's holiday window

Macy’s mixed classic with modern for its Miracle on 34th Street, Yes, Virginia, and Elf-inspired windows (above), while Henri Bendel’s windows (below) are an ode to the New York City Ballet’s production of The Nutcracker.

Henri Bendel window display

Saks Fifth Avenue has gone high-tech with a large-scale projection light show, the world’s first in terms of scale and duration in the use of new video-mapping technology. In the style of the Ralph Lauren 4-D event, the technology allows for the building to look like its features are being changed. Saks’ light show tells a tale of how snowflakes and bubbles struggle to live together before harmoniously coexisting with the help of the store.

Saks window display

Saks holiday window

Saks holiday window display

Bloomingdale’s, arguably the most disappointing of all, has installed nearly 100 flat screen televisions in its window which play a rotating series of winter displays. On the plus side, the screens are accompanied by cheery music which passersby can enjoy while zipping past the department store. 

Bloomingdale's holiday window display

 

select images courtesy of WWD

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